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Women in Ancient Near Eastern Warfare: Semiramis, Stateira Ii, Tomyris, Zabibe, Samsi Books LLC

Women in Ancient Near Eastern Warfare: Semiramis, Stateira Ii, Tomyris, Zabibe, Samsi

Books LLC

Published September 15th 2010
ISBN : 9781158489633
Paperback
30 pages
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Chapters: Semiramis, Stateira Ii, Tomyris, Zabibe, Samsi. Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 28. Not illustrated. Free updates online. Purchase includes a free trial membership in the publishers book club where you can select from more than a million booksMoreChapters: Semiramis, Stateira Ii, Tomyris, Zabibe, Samsi. Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 28. Not illustrated. Free updates online. Purchase includes a free trial membership in the publishers book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Excerpt: For the ancient Greeks Semiramis was a legendary Assyrian queen. Many legends have accumulated around her bold personality. Various efforts have been made to identify her with real persons. She is sometimes identified with the real Shammuramat (in Greek, Semiramis), the Assyrian wife of Shamshi-Adad V (ruled 811 BC808 BC), King of Assyria . The legends narrated by Diodorus Siculus, Justin and others from Ctesias of Cnidus make a picture of her and her relationship to King Ninus. The name of Semiramis came to be applied to various monuments in Western Asia, the origin of which was forgotten or unknown. Ultimately every stupendous work of antiquity by the Euphrates or in Iran seems to have been ascribed to her, even the Behistun Inscription of Darius. Herodotus ascribes to her the artificial banks that confined the Euphrates and knows her name as borne by a gate of Babylon. The Hanging Gardens of Babylon, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World are also known as the Hanging Gardens of Semiramis. Various places in Assyria, Mesopotamia and Medea bore the name of Semiramis, but slightly changed, even in the Middle Ages, and an old name of the city of Van was Shamiramagerd. Assyrians still name female children Semiramis to this day. The Shepherd finds the Babe Semiramis, by Ernest Wallcousins (1915).According to legend, Semiramis was of noble parents, the daughter of the fish-goddess Derketo of Ascalon in Syria and a mortal. Derketo abandoned her at birth and drowned herself. The child was fed by doves until she was found and brought up by Simmas, the royal shepherd. Afterwards she married Onnes or Menones, one of the generals of Ninus. Ninus was so struck...More: http: //booksllc.net/?id=14727